Naming and shaming sites that make dubious health claims

Legal, decent, honest and truthful. It doesn’t sound too much to ask, but many traders
continue to use misleading advertising claims on their websites – and the list is dominated by health products.

If the UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) decides that an online ad does not comply with the UK Advertising Code, it will make repeated requests for the dubious claim to be
amended: if traders still fail to comply, then details of the claim and the ASA decision are published. Looking down the list, it is dominated by health products, including something I misread as psychic dentistry.

Wonder products include a multi-tasking device claimed to help reduce HIV infection levels among other achievements, a supplement that can rebuild cartilage and a liquid chlorophyll that cleanses and deodorises the blood. Many of the sites claim proven health benefits for their products but fail to supply evidence of efficacy. It’s all a bit of a blast from the past.

Advert for electromagnetic bathing fluid, claimed to cure a range of serious conditions. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Advert for electromagnetic bathing fluid, claimed to cure a range of serious conditions. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

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